Notes on Russian America
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Notes on Russian America by K. T. Khlebnikov

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Published by Limestone Press in Kingston, Ontario, Fairbanks, Alaska .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Alaska -- Discovery and exploration. -- Russian.,
  • Alaska -- History -- To 1867.,
  • Russia -- Colonies. -- America.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Kiril Timofeevich Khlebnikov ; compiled, with an introduction and commentaries by Svetlana G. Fedorova ; edited by Richard Pierce.
SeriesAlaska history -- no. 42-43
ContributionsFedorova, S. G., Li︠a︡punova, R. G., Pierce, Richard A. 1918-.
The Physical Object
Pagination2 v. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL16603374M

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